twelve.

it’s been a couple of months, i know. but that’s fine because no one actually reads this. these words are just 1s and 0s flying out into cyberspace, dissipating into nothingness and falling on deaf ears.

lucky for me, my life has some pretty insignificant parts to it. what’s funny is how significant they feel each time they are present.

here’s a quick run down of everything that happened over the past five months.

i became a member of the executive council of my sorority, serving as historian. it’s kind of funny because this is almost exactly what i would love to do with my life. i am in charge of making scrap books, creating videos and running social media accounts for my sorority. people tout me as ‘the best historian we’ve had in years’ or ‘a god send,’ which is funny because social media is kind of the biggest scam in existence. twitter isn’t that hard. instagram isn’t hard, either. facebook is easy.

the older generations will hire out in order to gain social media notoriety, when, in actuality, all they need to do is post. it’s not very hard. it’s kind of funny, really.

we got ninety-two new members. it’s bitter-sweet, because we have beautiful new members, but their actions are less than beautiful. they are rambunctious, insane, and have little regard for the letters we proudly gave to them.

there’s a lot of flak happening with greek life, and these girls are representations of that. this isn’t the greek life that i joined. i joined a group of strong women dedicated to supporting one another and standing together. whether or not morals were loose, there was a sense of protection for one another. this group, i hope, will learn.

i took eighteen hours again this semester, but it was way worse than years before. however, i kept my scholarship at the end. the classes were challenging, but interesting.

in my women in religion in america class, i came into contact with the liberal christianity that permeates the religion department here. my peers would regularly ridicule conservative opinions, mentioning how ‘archaic’ or how ‘ignorant’ those who believed such things were.

but this just points to how terrible people can be when confronted with any beliefs other than their own. i’ve held several cordial conversations learning about the liberal perspective, writing my frustrations down and only trying to calmly and intellectually explain my own point. this comes from the idea that both points are valid. they are merely perspectives, not a right or a wrong answer. everyone has a right to their opinion, and, in many cases, there is no point in arguing. Why not learn about the other perspective in order to gain perspective? i just don’t understand people who feel the need to get on a soap box about everything or fight about everything.

one of the most disturbing things i had in the class, though, was when we were talking about foreign missions. she mentioned that the first women who served overseas were not called missionaries, but missionary wives. this was, as she noted, because the men had received training and the women had not. therefore, the women were not missionaries. while the sexism was present in the lack of training for women, the titles were not sexist. yes, the women began doing actual mission work instead of serving only as a wife. at this point, i believe they could be called missionaries. for example, a president’s wife is not the president but the first lady.

she then asked whether or not i would be okay doing mission work without the title of “missionary.” now, for me, this is a very important question that i have been struggling with. we are called in matthew to go out and make disciples of all nations. this does not mention anything about “also you must be called a missionary.” in fact, i believe that we are all called to be missionaries and, therefore, no one should require the title. i said i would be okay with it because i would know i am doing the work of the lord. i don’t need a label or any validation from humanity to tell me that i am doing what god has for me.

she told me, verbatim, “many times, women devalue themselves by not allowing themselves to receive the labels they deserve. this stems from the feeling that they will be unable to receive this label and are inadequate.”

this is a far cry from the truth. i believe wholeheartedly that i have the capabilities and that i could easily take the title if i felt that i needed it in order to do the lord’s work. however, i think that if someone is so focused on the title and not the mission, then they do not deserve the title and should re-assess their priorities. but, once again, it is not my place to judge their intentions.

i think that the root of the feminism movement as it stands today is insecurity. i am a feminist in that i believe in the empowerment of women. however, i do not believe in the degradation of men in the process. nor do i believe that i must completely reject female heritage. i believe that i am able to do anything and everything a man can do. i believe that, if i do the same work, i deserve the same pay. i believe that i deserve equal rights. i believe that i am just as important as a man.

however, i do not need to prove this to anyone. if a person tells me that i am lesser, i will confront the problem. but, in the mean time, i will simply know that i am equal. i will know that i am equal, and i will find my confidence in that.

other things happened in the past six months, but these are my biggest soap boxes.

xoxo kr

Advertisements